Eat Something: A Wise Sons Cookbook for Jews Who Like Food and Food Lovers Who Like Jews

Eat Something: A Wise Sons Cookbook for Jews Who Like Food and Food Lovers Who Like Jews

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From nationally recognized Jewish brand Wise Sons, the cookbook Eat Something features over 60 recipes for salads, soups, baked goods, holiday dishes, and more.

This long-awaited cookbook (the first one for Wise Sons!) is packed with homey recipes and relatable humor; it is as much a delicious, lighthearted, and nostalgic cookbook as it is a lively celebration of Jewish culture.

Stemming from the thesis that Jews eat by occasion (and with enthusiasm), the book is organized into 19 different events and celebrations chronicling a Jewish life in food, from bris to shivah, and all the makeshift and meaningful events in between, including: Shabbat, Passover, the high holidays, first meal home from college, J-dating, wedding, and more.

• Both a Jewish humor book and a cookbook
• Recipes are drawn from the menus of their beloved Bay Area restaurants, as well as all the occasions when Jews gather around the table.
• Includes short essays, illustrations, memorabilia, and stylish plated food photography.

Wise Sons is a nationally recognized deli and Jewish food brand with a unique Bay Area ethos—inspired by the past but entirely contemporary, they make traditional Jewish foods California-style with great ingredients.

Recipes include Braided Challah, Big Macher Burger, Wise Sons’ Brisket, Carrot Tzimmes, and Morning After Matzoquiles, while essays include Confessions of a First-Time Seder Host, So, You Didn’t Marry a Jew, and Iconic Chinese Restaurants, As Chosen by the Chosen People.

• The perfect gift for Wise Sons fans of all ages, lovers of Jewish food and humor, as well as gift-givers young and old looking for Jewish-themed gifts for bar mitzvahs, birthdays, weddings, and more
• Great for those who enjoyed Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking by Michael Solomonov, The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List by Alana Newhouse, and Russ & Daughters: Reflections and Recipes from the House That Herring Built by Mark Russ Federman
• A must for anyone looking to expand their knowledge of Jewish cuisine and culture

From the Publisher

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You look skinny.

Wise Sons Jewish Delicatessen was founded in San Francisco in 2011. This cookbook is not just another book about Jewish food, there are plenty of those—but about Jews and food. Consider it a scrapbook, of sorts, covering life’s main events, filled with anecdotes and essays, illustrations and archival images, and all the recipes every good Jew or bad Jew or wannabe Jew needs.

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Wise Sons’ philosophy is to preserve our past, and make it taste better.

Not unlike the way Jews of our generation approach Judaism today: We respect our traditions, but make them our own. Which includes writing this book about Jewish food that—feh!—might include a recipe for a cheeseburger, and maybe even make you laugh.

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A casual, contemporary, lighthearted take on a book about Jewish food.

Our lives, as Jews, revolve around food in a way that’s at once fanatical, logical, and comical, and, to be honest, kind of pathological. Especially when family is in town. While spreading the cream cheese on our bagels, we discuss where we should go for lunch; while the Russian dressing drips from our Reubens, we ruminate over dinner reservations.

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Food is life, our need to overorder is real.

Of course, this laser focus on food—on both being well fed and feeding others—is not unique to Jews. Indians and Iranians, Chinese and Koreans, we’re all passionate about scoring prime reservations and packing plenty of snacks and serving abundant platters. God forbid someone goes hungry: Eating—along with studying and practicing and striving and surviving—it’s an immigrant thing. Whether we came to America last year or last century, our roots run deep.

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Manny’s Morning After Matzoquiles

Serves 2

Mazto brei is a messy scramble of broken-up matzo and eggs, and every family has their way of making it. Some like it sweet, some like it savory. At Wise Sons, we like it spicy. Our chef Manny and our kitchen crew came up with this version one Passover, and it’s been a favorite ever since.

In a medium bowl, combine the matzo pieces and eggs and set aside for 5 minutes to soak. Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until sizzling. Add the matzo mixture to the pan and season with the salt. Cook for 2 minutes for soft eggs, stirring often to scramble the eggs, but folding the ingredients carefully so as not to turn the matzo into mush.

Add the tomatillo sauce and cook until hot, another 30 seconds. Serve immediately in a shallow bowl, with the toppings of your choice alongside.

Add fresh cilantro leaves, sour cream, thinly sliced white onion, sliced radishes, crumbled cotija cheese, and sliced avocado for serving

Ingredients

2 sheets matzo, broken into large pieces

4 large eggs, beaten

2 tsp vegetable oil

¼ tsp Diamond Crystal kosher salt

1/2cup [120 ml] Tomatillo Sauce

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Tomatillo Sauce

Preheat the oven to 450°F [230°C]. In a large bowl, toss the tomatillos, jalapeños, onion, garlic, oil, and salt until well coated. Transfer the mixture to a large baking sheet. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until fragrant and the toma­tillos are soft, but not quite bursting. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly, 10 to 15 minutes.

Transfer the tomatillo mixture to a blender or food processor, and purée until smooth. Let cool. If not using right away, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. This sauce freezes well, for up to 3 months.

Ingredients

1½ lb [680 g] tomatillos, husked

2 jalapeño chiles, stemmed

1 medium yellow onion, peeled and quartered

2 garlic cloves, peeled and trimmed

1 Tbsp olive oil

½ tsp Diamond Crystal kosher salt

Eat Something: A Wise Sons Cookbook for Jews Who Like Food and Food Lovers Who Like Jews

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